Facts about Slovenia from A to Z

 

Slovenia - Between Alps and the Adriatic...

Slovenia, the most northern republic of former Yugoslavia, reminds a little of Austria. For almost 1,000 years the country with its long mountainsides and green valleys appertained to Austria. Within different climatic zones of Alps and Adriatic, Slovenia offers a wide variety of sights: the spas like Rogaska Slatina, the wine cellars of Maribor, the baroque buildings of the capital Ljubljana or the stud of Lipica, where they bred the horses for Austria’s Spanish Court Riding School. With its 12 ski resorts, which are still very reasonable, it’s also attracting friends of winter sports.    

Our offer is as manifold and diverse as the country Slovenia itself. For years, we selected vacation houses and apartments all over Slovenia for you. Set your focus: remarkably reasonable accommodations, objects in the mountains, vacation houses with a view of the sea or apartments at a lake, objects for the winter or the summer holidays, for seniors, for families and so on.

Over 120 objects, holiday houses, apartments, rooms, hotels and farms in Slovenia are awaiting you, clearly arranged and with detailed descriptions, including pictures and floor plan. All object can directly be booked online.

Green Mediterranean
Mystical Karst

Vivid Ljubljana

Sunny Alps

Sightseeing from A to Z
Location
Country Dimensions, Population

Capital

Journey

Use of roads

Entry Requirements

Pets

Weather

Language

Currency

Opening Hours

Post and Telephone

Banks

Water and Electricity

Vaccinations

Medicine

Addresses

 

Explore Slovenia from the Alps to the Adriatic...

Slovenia, the most northern republic of former Yugoslavia, reminds a little of Austria. For almost 1,000 years the country with its long mountainsides and green valleys appertained to Austria. Within different climatic zones of Alps and Adriatic, Slovenia offers a wide variety of sights: the spas like Rogaska Slatina, the wine cellars of Maribor, the baroque buildings of the capital Ljubljana or the stud of Lipica, where they bred the horses for Austria’s Spanish Court Riding School. Visiting Slovenia, you have to go to the Adelsberger Grottoes - with its 12 still reasonable ski resorts it’s also attracting friends of winter sports.

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Green Mediterranean

Adriatic Feelings (Picture: B. Bajželj)

The Slovenian coast of 46.6 km length is covered by lush vegetation. You’ll find the salines of Secovlje here, already being mentioned back in the 13th century. Due to its cultural and national importance, it has been declared a nature reserve. Piran, Izola and Koper are places alluring with their medieval townscape. Koper is well known for its historical old town, making it the most picturesque place of northern Istria. Sportive activities are dominated by water sports of course. The town has set up a marina and there is a summer festival each year. Particularly attracting are the surroundings of Koper and the back-country: the vertical rocks at Crni Kal and Osp are an eldorado for free climbers, the rural environment features a customary gastronomy and first class regional wines. The longest tradition as a holiday resort has the mondaine Portorož, thus being renowned across the borders for its modern bathing facilities, varied gastronomy and different events.

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Mystical Karst

One out of 1,000 Caves (Picture: B. Kladnik)

Due to the limestone and the water, the karst has two faces, one above and one below the surface. Above the ground you’ll find a range of characteristical features of the karst like dolines, springs and sinks, slots and polje (Planinsko Polje, Cerkniško Polje); underneath the surface, sinkholes and caves stretch all over the karst. They say, the Slovenian karst offers a piece of the nicest underworld of our planet. There are more than a thousand sinkholes and caverns of which 20 have been made accessible, filled with masterpieces of lime created by underground dripping waters. The most famous grotto is Postojnska jama, which has been documented in 1213 for the first time. But that’s not the end of sights of the Slovenian karst. 

A lot of people are unaware of Slovenia being the home of the noble Lipizzaner horses. The village of Lipica with its 400 year-old stud is the cradle of this white horse breed. The Slovenian karst is also known for stone houses with excellent wines served in their cellars, particularly Teran, served with Pršut, a ham, air-dried by the breezy karts wind Bora. A prime example for a typical karst village is Štanjel, which is an urban monument, distinguished by its terraced medieval townscape.

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Vivid Ljubljana

Market at Ljubljana (Picture: J. Skok)

The people of Ljubljana as many visitors judge the city of 275.000 inhabitants, to be a place made to measure its people. Although it counts to the medium sized European cities, it has still kept the charm of a smaller town, at the same time providing metropolitain standards. It’s a place where east and west collide, interweaving harmonically the new and the old. Ljubljana has traces of 5 millenniums of its history still being visible, like the heritage of the roman Emona and the old town with the medieval castle, renaissance and baroque fronts, ornated portals and warped roofs. The mosaic is completed by pictural bridges over the Ljubljanica and the spacious Tivoli Park, reaching right into the city centre. Today’s cityscape is partially due to the Italian baroque anpartially by the younger Art Nouveau, mirroring in numerous buildings raised after tzhe earthquake of 1895. A strong cultural imprint has been left by the works of the Europe-wide renowned architect Jože Plecnik, who was born here. The cityscape was later added by buildings of his more modern scholars and finally accomplished by the works of a generation of well reputed young Slovenian architects. In the warm months, cafés and inns set their tables outside, at the banks of the Ljubljanica, on the streets and markets of the old town. The citizens of Ljubljana meet for a morning coffee, after the obligatory visit of the vegetable market on Saturdays, the flea markets on Sundays or at the evening exchanging ides with their friends. The first impression a visitor gets of Ljubljana is that of a young city, because more than 50,000 students keep up a vivid pulse.

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Sunny Alps

Holidays at the Alps (Picture: J. Skok)

The mighty but accessible Julian Alps lie amidst an attracting geographically rounded region, linking four popular holiday resorts: Bled, Kransjka Gora, Bohinj and Bovec with the Soca valley. The majority of this region is part of the Triglav National Park, one of the larger European parks with 85 hectares of ground. Triglav National Park with bold peaks and the Mount Triglav - the highest Slovenian summit (2,864 m) – deeply cut wild water gorges, high alpine karst ravines and friendly alps, where lots of endemic kinds of animals and plants (chamois, ibex, wood and black grouse, eagles and marmot live amidst a unique flora), keeping the traditions and the hard life of the alps and mountains. At the banks of the park lies Bled at the lake, its landmarks, the church of the 17th century with the famous bell of wishes on the island in the middle of the lake and the medieval castle rising steeply above the lake. Bohinj is an ideal starting point for unnumbered mountain tours, the Lake Bohinjsko jezero with the River Bohinjska Bistrica is an eldorado for water sports (kayaking, canoeing, rafting, hydrospeeding, swimming) and fishing. In the surroundings there are ski slopes and cross country runs, as well as enough occasions for mountain bikers, paragliders, rock climbers, riders, archers, tennis and mini golf players. The very popular destination Kranjska Gora tempts with its outdoor sport activities (hiking, alpinism, cycling, riding, delta flying, fishing etc.) and in winter with excellent slopes and different ways of winter enjoyments like teams of dogs, night luging on Mount Vršič, snowmobile tours. The Soca valley, the valley of the turquoise river is well visited by those looking for relaxation and those tempted by adrenaline sports. The Soca is particularly popular for water sports, being an optimal venue for kayak and canoe tours, canyoning and rafting, and even anglers will find what they are looking for.

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Location

Between Alps and Adriatic Sea (Picture: STO/GIS)

Slovenia is located on the transition between Middle and Southeastern Europe, neighbouring Italy in the west, the Adriatic in the south west, Austria in the north and north west, Hungary in the north east and Croatia in the south east. 

 

 

 

 

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Country Dimensions and Population

Lake-side Bled (Picture: D. Mladenovič)

Slovenia measures 20,273 square kilometres and has over 2 million inhabitants (as at 2005).

 

 

 

 

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Capital

Capital wth Heart (Picture: J. Skok)

Ljubljana (Laibach), about 275,000 residents (320,000 with suburbs).

Ljubljana is spreading in a basin between karst and Alps at an altitude of almost 300 metres above sea level. One says, it is just large enough to offer everything neccesary for a capital, but however small enough to preserve the individuality of its citizen. It is a city with its own soul. The majestic medieval castle dominates the baroque old town, art nouveau residences and the master pieces of the world-renowned Slovenian architect Jože Plecnik.

Legend has it that Ljubljana has been founded by Jason, the greec hero. In the early ages, Jason stole the Golden Fleece from the king of Kolchis. He and his compainions escaped from their pursuers aboard his ship Argo. But instead of fleeing southward the Aegean, they reached the estuary mouth of the Danube by mistake. They made their way to the fount of the Ljubljanica. There Jason came upon a terrible monster, battled it and killed it. This was assumed to be the dragon of Ljubljana as depicted on the city arms at the castle’s pinnacle. 

By referendum on decembre, 23rd of 1990 the Slovenian people voted for the autonomy of their country. On June 25th of 1991, Slovenia declared its independence. Thus Ljubljana became capital of the independent state of Slovenia and the center of political, cultural, economic and scientific life of the Slovenian nation. Compared to other European capitals, with only about 275.000 inhabitants Ljubljana is still a city making to measure its people.

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Journey

The Simplest Way (Picture: Bobo)

Travelling by car: coming from Munich in Germany, head for Slovenia via the A8 and the A1 in Austria, direction Salzburg interchange. Take the A10 there to Villach and the Karavanken tunnel heading for Ljubljana. The way to western Slovenia (to Triglav National Park or the Soca Valley) leads over Arnoldstein in Austria and Tarvisio in Italy. The eastern part of Slovenia is best reached via the motor way from Graz to Maribor.

Travelling by plane: a flight from Frankfurt/Main to Ljubljana takes about 1 to 1½ hrs. A clever option is an inexpensive flight to Klagenfurt switching to a rental car there.

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Use of roads

Excellent Road Network (Picture: STO/GIS)

There is still no complete motorway network, but only large sections, for which already tolls are charged. Tolls are raised following classifications – there are four classes.




 

 

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Entry Requirements for German Citizens (Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

The entry or journey through Slovenia for visitation is permitted with a valid passport or identity card – this applies for up to three month, independently of the intentions for entry.   

Any stay exceeding 3 month needs a residence permit (EU) of the responsible administrative unit. Children of your company have to be registered in your passport or bear a valid children’s passport. Invalid documents disqualify any border crossing, particularly at the EU’s outer borders to Croatia, even if only transfer through Slovenia to Croatia is intended. This applies also in those cases, when neither passport nor identity card is at hand. Delays arising due to a lack of valid documents are explicitly pointed out.

The attention of citizens of third states living in Germany is invited to the fact, that German residence permits aren’t automatically granting entry to or transit through Slovenia. In any case the reqirement of any valid visa on the base of Slovenia’s self-contained law on aliens should be verified at the competent representation of Slovenia in Germany. In case of entry or a transit with a valid Schengen visa, please check the amount of possible entries left to the Schengen union. Since the Republik of Slovenia is not yet member of the Schengen Agreement, you will need at least two apparent entries on the visa label for a unproblematic return.

Import and transit of so-called ‘cold weapons’ (items that are suited to attack persons, as knuckledusters, knifes with sharp twin blades, bayonets, batons etc.) is strictly prohibited, even after entry in the EU. Any other weapons have to be declared at the border and partially require a special permit, as given by the customs officers.

Entry requirements for German citzens may change on short notice, without informing the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Before starting your journey, it is recommended to inquire information about entry and transit regulations at the Slovenian representaions in Germany.

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Pets

Any person travelling to EU member states with their dog, cat or ferret (noncommercial delivery of pets within intra-community tourist traffic) need the new EU pet passport with confirmation of anti-rabies inoculation and the prescribed identifikation of the animal. In some member states (Great Britain, Ireland or Sweden) additional national reglementations are applied. Information are provided by the veterinary administration of Slovenia or local veterinary offices. Other pets (rodents, crawlers, amphibians, ornamental fish, birds) are subject to national regulations; information are provided in the home countries or at


Website: http://www.vurs.gov.si
e-Mail: vurs(at)gov.si

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Weather

Summer, Sun & Sunshine (Picture: Bobo)

You should always have appropriate clothing at hand - according to the season - since Slovenia is located within three climatic zones: the mediterranean climate at the coast, the alpine climate of the Alps, the Karawanken and at higher ranges, and finally the continental climate in the north east of the country. Temperatures average out at above 20° C in July and 0° C in January; yet in the summertime it might be hot at the Adriatic and at the same time quite cold in the mountains. Before travelling to Slovenia, get infomation about the weather prediction.

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Language

Official language is Slovenian, minoritiy languages are Hungarian and Italian. But infact many Slovenians speak English as well.

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Currency

The Euro is Legal Tender...

Since January the 1st of 2007 the Euro (€) is official means of payment in Slovenia. 

 

 

 

 

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Opening Hours

Market Place at Ljubljana (Picture: J. Skok)

Shops are usually open from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm (some until 9:00 pm) on weekdays, from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm on Saturdays and some even on Sundays and holidays. Means of payment is the Euro, but most shops accept credit cards (American Express, Diners, Euro-/Mastercard, Visa).

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Post and Telephone

Post offices are open on weekdays between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm and on Saturdays between 8:00 and 12:00 am. In larger cities the head office is serviced in the evening and on Saturday afternoons. Public telephone boxes work with phone cards, which are on sale at tobacconists and in post offices. For international call dial 00 and the country prefix. The international prefix for Slovenia is 00 386. Slovenia is almost completely covered with mobile phone stations of the Slovenian providers, who are roaming partners for all major European mobile network.

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Banks

At Slovenian banks, tourists can change money, cash traveller cheques, open an account, transfer cash money and process cashless payments. Banks are open from 9:00 to 12:00 am on workdays and from 2:00 to 5:00 pm, some even on Saturdays between 9:00 and 12:00 am. Money can be changed in exchange offices, at hotel receptions, in travel agencies, at gas stations and in shopping malls. On top of that, there is a dense net of cash points.

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Water and Electricity

Water has drinking water quality. Electricity: 220 V, 50 Hz.

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Vaccinations

Children should have protection provided by vaccination according to immunization schedule. Adults also should generally check their protection against tetanus, diphtheria and polio; have it refreshed in case. In many areas vaccination against tick bites is advisable.

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Medicine

Medical supply is satisfactory in larger cities, however unincisive off the main roads. Emergency medical services are generally good. Emergency aid is mostly provided by the hospitals of Ljubljana and Maribor, where all modern examination methods and tools are present. A lack in pharmaceuticals is not to expect, though some should be brought along. Treatment expenses for privatly insured are partially above average and have to be paid cash. Compulsary health insurance advises to ask for special forms for Slovenia at your health insurance. This has to be shown firstly to the Slovenian health insurance carrier and then to be handed over to the attending physician. There are no costs in these cases. The ministry of forreign affairs recommends additional health insurance for foreign countries including recovery service.

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Address of the German Representation

Slovenian Ensign (Picture: Bobo)

Embassy of the Federal Republik of Germany in Ljubljana:

Presernova 27
1000 Ljubljana

Slovenia

Fon: (00386 1) 479 03 00
Fax: (00386 1) 425 08 99

 

 

 

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